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Stroke: The Myths & Facts


Posted in: Blogs , English

Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in America, yet many myths still surround this condition. Knowing who is at risk and how to spot the symptoms can help you act quickly during a stroke emergency. When stroke happens, prompt care is critical to survival.

Stroke: Plan for It

Locate your nearest St. Luke’s Health emergency services provider, and make a plan for your family. If stroke occurs, St. Luke’s Health can provide a seamless transfer from any of our emergency rooms to our Comprehensive Stroke Centers located at St. Luke's Health–The Woodlands Hospital and Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center.

The Myths & Facts of Stroke

Myths Facts
You can’t prevent stroke. Managing risk factors like hypertension, high cholesterol, smoking, obesity and diabetes could prevent up to 80 percent of all strokes.
Stroke occurs in the heart. Stroke is a “brain attack,” and occurs when blood vessels to the brain become blocked.
Stroke only affects seniors. Stroke risk increases with age, but strokes can happen to anyone at any age.
There is no treatment for stroke. Call 911 at any sign of stroke as prompt treatment can improve outcomes.
Strokes aren’t hereditary. If there is family history of stroke, you have an increased risk.

Talk with your family about the myths and facts surrounding stroke. With the right information, you can act F.A.S.T and minimize potential complications from stroke.

 

Sources:
National Stroke Association | Stroke facts
Go Red for Women | Facts, Causes and Risks of Stroke 
Stroke 101

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